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German Army bread recipe
Topic Started: Mar 17 2011, 11:12 PM (7,946 Views)
FargoMarc
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This recipe is for German Army ration bread (kriegsbrot) and is from 1914 (and no, it doesn't contain sawdust!)

Ingredients


3 ½ C rye flour

3 C unbleached whoite flour or whole flour

½ C cocoa

2 packs of active dry yeast

1 TBSP caraway seeds

2 TSP salt

½ C honey or brown sugar

Vegetable oil

2 TBSP butter



Mix both flours, cocoa, caraway seed and salt in large bowl

Mix 2 cups of water, honey or brown sugar, and butter in a sauce pan and heat until dissolved. Cool slightly and add yeast.

Mix all of these ingredients in the large bowl and add enough vegetable oil to cover dough ball. Knead until it forms a pliable dough.

Let the dough rest in a warm place and cover it.

Grease and flour one or two baking sheets

Once the dough rises (at least 2 hours) punch it down and knead it again to get the air out.

Roll into a ball and flatten slightly to a height of about 2 ½ inches. (The bread shouldn’t be in a loaf,it should be rounded)

Lightly brush to top with oil.

Let set until it rises again (1-2 hours)

Bake at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until it is done

.

Makes one loaf about 1 kilo in weight







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Devo
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And the 1918 version,

As above, but replace rye flour with sawdust and wheat flour with dried turnip leaves.
Omit sugar, butter and oil, as they are not available.

Discard after attempting to eat, and raid enemy trench for some decent food.

-Devo
K.u.K. IR 61
IR 61 Website
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Prussian101
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hi,
thanks for the recipe made some today, it was hard, dry and had a putrid overpowering taste :'(
so overall 100% accurate :blink: :notworthy:
really good stuff and it has found a way into my breadbag's iron rations D:)

Danke
Herr Saville
:cross:

P.S ill post some pics
mskr Oskar Klembitz
5 komp (2. rhien) IR28
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Prussian101
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here some are
Attached to this post:
Attachments: 004.jpg (4.49 MB)
mskr Oskar Klembitz
5 komp (2. rhien) IR28
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MitEinerHaltung
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Zweiter Kommandant von Töpfen und Pfannen, Fontanak Gedenkstätte FeldKüche
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I think I'll continue to buy my bread at my local German bakery!! ;)
Anton Ebans
Fontanak Gedenkstätte Feldküche
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Prussian101
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Think I'm going to eat this? B) dream on, it's a subsitute for when the grenades runnout, even a Frenchman won't eat this :rolling:
mskr Oskar Klembitz
5 komp (2. rhien) IR28
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soldat
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If you want to go really big......

Field Bread

1916 US Manual for Army Bakers
Pages 82-83

Yield: 144 pounds
Portion: about 16 ounces
INGREDIENTS WEIGHTS MEASURES
Flour
Sugar
Salt 105 lb.
3 lb.
2 lb. ---
---
---
Cottonseed oil, or lard 8 oz.
Water
Compressed yeast ---
12 oz. 6 gal. 2 qt.
---

Method:

Mix unto a very stiff dough.

Dough should be ready to punch the first time in four and one-half hours. Punch second time after one-hour.

Scale at 4 pounds 8 ounces, round up, and flatted into a round loaf about 1-1/2 inches thick.

Allow only 15 minutes proof in the pan.

Just before putting in the oven make a round hole in the center of the loaf with the ends of the thumb and forefinger joined together. This hole is sufficient size to permit the gas to escape and will result in a load less liable to crush in transportation, less subject to mild, and with a smoother appearance that had been slashed across the surface with a knife.

Allow the chamber doors to remain open for the last 15 minutes of baking.

Bake for one hour and a half at 475o F, letting fall to 450o F last half hour.

Notes on field bread production:

The close texture of the field bread is due to the extremely stiff dough, well kneaded, and the short proof in the pan. The tough crust to the small amount of cottonseed oil (or lard used).

When making continuos runs of field bread divide the men of the unit into two shifts of two men each, each shift working eight hours, and taking up the work at the point left off by the preceding shift. The shifts should alternate from day to day in order equalize the work.

For field bread make a dough every hour and 30 minutes. Seven runs can be produced in 16 hours by this method. This is considered an average day's work for a unit and is about the maximum amount of work the men can stand continuously, although they can produce 10 runs per day for a short time.

Seven runs will give 1,008 pounds per unit each day, 9,072 pounds to the 9 units peace strength, 12,096 to 12 units war strength.

Happy baking
Beck
:army:
"You will be home before the leaves fall" The Kaiser. August 1914 Über Trinkmeister Die ApfelKorn Gruppe (Kinder des Korn)
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Prussian101
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Wow that thing'll feed the whole of newville! :P Does it taste better than the german stuf? :crazy:
mskr Oskar Klembitz
5 komp (2. rhien) IR28
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