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gew 88 parts
Topic Started: May 14 2009, 03:45 PM (1,134 Views)
sanitaeter
Vize-Feldwebel
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I am looking for some Gew 88 parts- right now the extractor, and the spring that moves up the thingy that pushed up the cartridges in the 88/14 version.
Anyone have any extra, or know where I might buy them?
thanks!

sanitaeter
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Hoffmann
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Feldwebelleutnant
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Those are rare and expensive parts my friend. See this Al Nelson Linky

You might also look at this website and forum Linky

Good luck,

Hoffmann

Posted Image
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Gew8805
Vize-Feldwebel
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Hoffman is right. You may be able to find the follower spring just about anywhere but the extractor availability is a problem. The link will help, look for Al Nelson who is listed under "Websites that sell Gew 88 Parts", he makes new parts, including the bolt head, extractor and ejector, all of which have dried up as originals. Reviews by shooters of his products have been excellent.

As an aside, you say you have an 88/14. How do you identify an 88/14? I have a feeling that you have an 88/05, the Gew88/14 is practically non existent with only a handful of examples known. Would love to see pictures.
T.P. Hern
IR92

"My life, when it is written, will read better than it lived."
James Goldman, "The Lion in Winter"
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sanitaeter
Vize-Feldwebel
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thanks for the help TP!
I am going on memory of old articles I read, some of which are contradictory! I have read that the bottom cover was spot welded in 1914, and removable in 1905, that the thumb cut out was much bigger in 1914, (another article says the 1914 conversions were crudely made, and the thumb cut ws turkish made. I am awaiting books and time to read through web site and match photos.
In any case, I am not in a position to argue my case well! this is a new field for me.
The weapon is a Erfurt, 1891, S marked chamber.
The stripper clips guides are present, there is a spring loaded cartridge retainer(?Name???) on the left side of the magazine. There is a small curve cut away for Sptizer cartridges present atthe top rear of the reciever. The bottom of the magazine is coveed, by a clip, dated 1915, and is spot welded on in four places. The weapon was once in the Reserve Infantry reg't 74 or 77, my notes are not here, but that is the markings on the barrel bands.
It seems in good condition, though there are goofy serial numbers on the left of the chamber,and above the Erfurt markings, which do not match each other.

there are turkish crescents onthe bolt in many places. Not so many, if at all onthe stock/barrel
when digital camera is repaired (I am going to try JB weld, battery cover is cracking intwo!) I could try to send them to you.
Peter Mann
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Alte junge
Sergeant
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The Gew 88 and conversions seem a very under estimated firearm for re-enacting, I wonder why that is....Might be just my experience.....

Robert
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sanitaeter
Vize-Feldwebel
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I think that the reason the Gew 88 is not common at Newville is that in my observation of photes, by about late 1916, early 1917, the 88 was not often in service with the frontline troops, and so many (I think) were sold to the turks.

If we were doing mid war, I would certianly fell the gew 88 should be in the hands of many Reserve units, and even a few regulars (I read somewhere of a regular unit that started with 98s, went to Russian rifles and then 88 for a while, and going back to 98)

I found the misfeed and mis ejection is far lower with red tip, full length cartridges. Some failures, but not as much as the shorter (Green tipped ,270 blanks I had around the gun area)
Peter
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Verdun_Hadji
Vize-Feldwebel
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Sani,
I have an Army Commission M1888. As a matter of fact it was my first rifle bought at a Gibson's in Uvalde, Texas for fifty-two dollars with tax.
It is marked Loewe Berlin 1891 with a rather thick crescent (almost a croissant) and an "S". Ludwig Loewe was a Mauser subcontractor. Receiver and barrel 5939. The barrel bands are probably mismatched the upper band being marked 110.R.3.176 and the lower 80.R.8.145. The bolt has Turkish markings. The rear sight has been modified with one small sight leaf and the large knob on the right side removed and is marked 7,9 on the right side. The graduations are marked in Turkish.
I have seen M88s but no other 88/05s or 88/14s so the charger (stripper) clip "ears" have always confused me. The charger guides each have two small circular blemishes, which are hard to see unless you look real hard. They may be screws with the tops ground down, but the workmanship is so good its almost seamless. According to "The German Rifle" by John Walter the 88/14s ears were welded onto the front of the top of the receiver and were crudely shaped into "ears." My rifle is anything but crude.
There is a spring loaded cartridge retainer in the left wall of the magazine and a removeable stamped steel cover on the magazine bottom. Not having seen a M1888 I don't know if the internal parts are there, but the cartridges do not rattle around which Walter says they would if part were missing. These parts were necessary in the 88/05 because it no longer used the Mannlicher clip that served the same function in the M1888.
I bet you have an 88/05 like me. Fine peice of German craftmanship isn't it? :-)
See The German Rifle by John Walter. 1979. Fortress Publications Inc. Canada.
[size=1]
Ed
----------------------------------------------------
Edgar Macionga
3.K JR63[/size]
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sanitaeter
Vize-Feldwebel
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Actually, it is a fine rifle.
Of course, I have not loaded some mild cartridges yet.But, it balances well, I like the feel of it. I think it may hang a littlle low when slung, but usually when I am at Newville with a rifle, and that is not often, I wear it around my neck, like the Germans seem to prefere, andso, not a problem!

the bolt seems very smooth, a little slower to load as the stripper clip fits very tightly in the groves, but it works, but all in all,, I agree, it seems like a very fine rifle, and yes, I agree 100% with you, it is a 1905 modification. What confused me was since the magazine cover is dated 1915, I though it must have been converted then. I have since found out that the covers were not thought of till december 1914, hence the number of soldiers with open bottoms on the magazine in early photoes.
thanks for the note! I have a lot to learn, just got the book on the Comm 88 today. Great pictures! Will start reading it this week end.
Peter
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Gew8805
Vize-Feldwebel
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sanitaeter
May 15 2009, 08:22 PM
thanks for the help TP!
I am going on memory of old articles I read, some of which are contradictory! I have read that the bottom cover was spot welded in 1914, and removable in 1905, that the thumb cut out was much bigger in 1914, (another article says the 1914 conversions were crudely made, and the thumb cut ws turkish made. I am awaiting books and time to read through web site and match photos.
In any case, I am not in a position to argue my case well! this is a new field for me.
The weapon is a Erfurt, 1891, S marked chamber.
The stripper clips guides are present, there is a spring loaded cartridge retainer(?Name???) on the left side of the magazine. There is a small curve cut away for Sptizer cartridges present atthe top rear of the reciever. The bottom of the magazine is coveed, by a clip, dated 1915, and is spot welded on in four places. The weapon was once in the Reserve Infantry reg't 74 or 77, my notes are not here, but that is the markings on the barrel bands.
It seems in good condition, though there are goofy serial numbers on the left of the chamber,and above the Erfurt markings, which do not match each other.

there are turkish crescents onthe bolt in many places. Not so many, if at all onthe stock/barrel
when digital camera is repaired (I am going to try JB weld, battery cover is cracking intwo!) I could try to send them to you.
Peter Mann
May be taking this a little off topic but here is a thread at Gunboards concerning the rare Gew88/14. This is a reposting of John Sheehan's Gew88/14, one of only two that I have personally handled:

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=9415

At one time there was a 5 or 6 page discussion of the 88/14 but it has sadly been lost to time and a new format. There were some exceptionally detailed photographs in that one. *sigh* Hope this is of some interest, John is a well known collector of WW1 items and has an international reputation, his Gunboards forum on collecting WW1 is here:

http://forums.gunboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=24

We welcome any and all willing participants.

Max, I hope the links are allowed, if not please remove them.
T.P. Hern
IR92

"My life, when it is written, will read better than it lived."
James Goldman, "The Lion in Winter"
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