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1917 Enfield 30-06 Caliber; 1917 Enfield
Topic Started: Dec 14 2006, 09:18 PM (7,258 Views)
florida8th
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Hello Everyone,

I am seeking a Reproduction or Original 1917 Enfield rifle for AEF Reenacting but I am not sure where to look as I am having a difficult time locating this item.

thank you
Bob Kountz
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maxstiebritz
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I am Locutus of Stiebritz. We are IR459!
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Quote:
 
I am seeking a Reproduction or Original 1917 Enfield rifle for AEF Reenacting but I am not sure where to look as I am having a difficult time locating this item.


Hi Bob,

I did a search on gunbroker.com and came up with ten 1917 Enfields for sale. On Gunsamerica.com over fifteen 1917's. Only five came up on Austionarms.com - have fun!


:german:
Etatsma▀iger Feldwebel Max Stiebritz
8K/IR459




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lederhosen
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Vize-Feldwebel
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sometimes CMP will also have them in stock.
Craig Schultz
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Tuckahoe Doughboy
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Bob, several of the guys in the 318th have had success with gunsamerica.com. The prices are usually very reasonable and so often below the local market offered by the local small town gun dealers. On these sites try a number of searches --

M1917 Remington; M1917 Eddystone; M1917 Winchester; American Enfield; m1917 Enfield; P17 (the whole p17 thing just drives me nuts, but sadly too many folks use it so search it); P17 Eddystone and so on.

On Guns America I came up with these 1917 rifles for sale --

M1917 rifle #1

M1917 #2

M1917 #3

M1917 #4

1917 #5

You should generall figure to pay about $550 +/- for a M1917 made Eddystone. Winchesters and Remingtons about $650 +/-. I bought my Eddystone for $420 and you can find them for as little as $400.

There are no reproductions available only originals. However Mil Tech Arms does offer a nicely rebuilt weapon, if you are willing to pay the $1250 price. They have new barrels and stocks and all the other parts are refurbished.

One thing to keep in mid is that so very few are actually WW1 configuration anymore. Most of them were reworked at Federal arsenals on the eve of World War 2. Most will therefore have WW2 era barrels and some parts that are parkerized rather than blued. The nice thing is that these pieces are usually marked with the the arsenal where the work was performed and the inspector. You will also find that M1903.com is a useful site. While it provides a lot of information on the m1903, it also can be a valuable source for the M1917, providing manufacturing dates based on the serial number or based on the stamp on your weapon, where the weapon may have been reworked. I learned that my rifle (well the receiver atleast) was made by Eddystone in July 1918 and the barrel was replaced and the rifle reworked at the Ogden Utah arsenal and inspected by Elmer Keith.

The CMP last I have checked really didnt have much available in the way of M1917 rifles, and the few that I have seen come from the CMP were reall beat to shit. Really cheap, but not worth it for the work that you would have to put into it.

I will say I have thought about building a M1917 by purchasing each of the parts separately. I think it would be fun and if the parts are purchased smartly, probably would come in at less the cost of a complete rifle.

Hope this helps
Vincent Petty

"I pressed forward with the others to watch the United States physically entering the War, so god-like, so magnificent, so splendidly unimpaired in comparison with the tired nerve-racked men of the British Army. So these were our deliverers at last." British Nurse Vera Brittain

318th Infantry, 80th Division AEF
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Kopite91
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As an new draftee, I am on the search for an M-1917. Obviously I am not starting a new topic on how to find a 1917 or where is the best place to look and I have done plenty of searches on the topic of the rifles. My question or request starts at, what exactly does one need to look for when inspecting a prospective rifle? Of course one should identify the manufacturer as much as possible, but what other specifics in terms of bore size, barrel size, etc.?

It's much easier to buy a new repop, but GW isn't CW and we know that repops aren't available, so the search is more complicated.


Thanks,

-Russell :army:
Russell Bergmann
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Tuckahoe Doughboy
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Hey Russell, here are just a few thoughts regarding your questions --

On manufacturers, they were Winchester, Remington, and the Remington subsidiary at Eddystone. Eddystone is the more common rifle, while Winchester and Remington tend to carry a higher collector value. On each receiver of the rifle the manufacturer and serial number is stamped.

One thing to keep in mind is that some many 1917 rifles were rebuilt at arsenals prior to and early in WW2. It will be difficult to find an originally configured 1917. Much of the work was generally replacing of the barrels and sometimes other minor parts. Often the replacement of parts was not carried out with regard to manufacturer, so it is common to have an Eddystone with Remington or Winchester parts and vise-versa. Additionally many of these rifles had their finishes re-done as well ending up parkerized rather than blued.

When considering a rifle I would look at the following -- 1) a clean bore with no pitting. At the moment there are a lot of rifles coming out of VFWs and turned over to the CMP that were used with corrosive ammunition and not always properly cleaned. This is especially most important if you want a shooter. 2) Have the headspace checked. Most important if you ever intend to fire the rifle live. It is important the the chamber be properly sized and the cartridge properly seated in that chamber. Any gunsmith should have .30-06 headspace guages. 3) Does the action work properly and smoothly. Do the cartridges feed into the magazine? Does the bolt when operated smoothly pick up the cartridge and chamber it? When the bolt is retracted does it easily extract the cartridge? And finally is the cartridge strongly ejected?

The weakest part in the rifle is the ejector spring and when they are broken, the casing will not be ejected from the rifle. With any ejection problems, this is the first thing that should be checked. The ejector spring is part of the bolt stop assemble and is found on the left rear of the receiver. the following diagram shows figure #36, which is the ejector spring --

Posted Image

It is usually "part H" of the ejector spring that is broken. You can get them from Sarco in New Jersey or at local gunshows for anywhere from $15-35. Interestingly the ejector spring in my rifle is broken, but a very talented gunsmith along the way fitting a sturdy flat spring into the bolt stop assembly to replace that little part H. Works great and I have never felt the need to replace it with the proper spring.

Hope that help,
Vincent Petty

"I pressed forward with the others to watch the United States physically entering the War, so god-like, so magnificent, so splendidly unimpaired in comparison with the tired nerve-racked men of the British Army. So these were our deliverers at last." British Nurse Vera Brittain

318th Infantry, 80th Division AEF
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Kopite91
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Vince,
Thank you for that information. It gives me a good place to start when inspecting a possible purchase. I had found several "What to look for when buying" threads and articles pertaining to WWII, but none with the GW.

-Russell :army:
Russell Bergmann
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Guido
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Found my 1917 Remington in a local gun shop. Mint condition and the asking price was 520.00. I traded in a Colt Det Special and paid 100.00 cash on top of that. Best bet is to have any friends,etc. look out for one for ya. Gun shows, shops, internet auctions. Here are some pics.
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Transport
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Vize-Feldwebel
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Ahoy!
She looks like a dandy! How is the bore?

Transport out
If not us, then who?
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Guido
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Pretty good
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